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As discussed in my earlier post about Karma, the law of Karma is grounded firmly in Newton’s law of cause and effect: for every action there is a reaction. However, whether you totally realise this or not, when you reincarnated and came here to Earth you enrolled in a sort of spiritual classroom. There are lessons to be learned, exams to be passed before you can advance up the grades, and if you fail, then guess what you get held back a year for a re-sit. Everything that shows up in your life here on Earth is part of that education and learning process, however, unlike certain Buddhist concepts we are not supposed to inescapably suffer. Yes, life is/can be tough, but the suffering is all relative. Karmic debts are intended to be paid gracefully, without bitterness or resentment. Take responsibility. Firstly accept, then forgive and finally atone.

Just to be clear, it is our personal responsibility to clear our karma, in so far as tempting as it may appear, there are no magic mantra’s which enable us to delegate this responsibility. Where some modern religious groups imply that if you ‘say the words: “I accept the Lord Jesus as my saviour and ask for forgiveness.’’ That somehow absolves you, it does not and it’s a sort of spiritual laziness and playing hooky with your homework. We are supposed to seek the truth, our own truth which comes from learning our own lessons and atoning our mistakes.

There are many people and indeed animals with whom we enter into karmic contracts. Some people disagree about animals having souls and re-incarnating, but I have had experience of two of my horses re-incarnating and indeed this is the central premise of my metaphysical crime novel Spirit of Prophecy. I hold back on judgement as to whether or not animals can reincarnate as humans and visa versa as I really can’t comment on that. What I can say though is that all animals feel pain, want love, compassion and dogs, for instance, epitomise a consistency of unconditional love that is difficult for us humans to achieve, even the devout and those of us on a spiritual path seeking awakening and enlightenment.  My daughters are both vegan and have recently converted me [Watch out for my VEGAN WITCH blog posts] but actually the guy who really convinced me was Earthling Ed, check out some of his talks on YOUTUBE or maybe check out his restaurant Unity Diner in North London, UK. Ed is so persuasively reasonable when he points out that all animals feel pain, and whilst dog lovers around the world are mortified by the dog slaughter and consumption in Seoul, that is their choice and custom. Pigs are more intelligent than dogs, they are killed for consumption out of sight and suddenly materialise on the diner’s plate. How is that okay then? I came lately to the logical conclusion that it is not.

With regards to how to balance your karma, energy work, [e.g. Akashic Record level] and clearing [ [e.g. Ancestral] can be awesome but as with the Jesus analogy above, we need to park it and then go along for the ride and fully participate. Negativity and blocks accumulate at a number of different levels:

  1. At the ancestral/family lineage level, [and that’s proven to pass down in our DNA by way of cellular memories.]
  2. At the past lives level.
  3. At the Inner Child level which also benefits from release and forgiveness work.
  4. At the current day EGO level – yes, we have to watch out so that instead of clearing the above, we don’t go accumulating new karma to keep us endlessly on the treadmill, right?

Remember everything is ENERGY, so go benefit from any energy work eg Reki, shamanic healing that you feel resonates with you. [If you’d like my personal recommendations for Akashic Record and Ancestral clearing work, feel free to drop me an email.]

Back to you more actively balancing your karma, which needs to be done in conjunction with positive and beneficial energy practices. When something severely negative happens to you, realise that you inflicted the same kind of pain/trauma on another [most likely the same person] in a previous existence, or you wouldn’t be on the receiving end now. You may protest your totally astonishment and innocence and try to blame/shame the other person. Work through your anger/grief/pain – release it, that’s usual, get it out of your system – whatever it takes but just don’t dwell on it. Instead without bitterness or resentment towards the other person – let it go – step up to a new level of sincere and genuine acceptance that you set this into motion yourself in a previous life. You probably won’t recall the circumstances, but often on reflection we see patterns, recurring themes which just keep repeating themselves. Admit your mistake, don’t try to hide – it will always catch up with you in the end and often with a big rebound effect. Better grasp the nettle rather than sweep things under the carpet to fester, I feel. After all that chip on your shoulder will simply weigh you down. We can’t stop all problems checking in, but we can stop them from over-staying their welcome.

Many of the issues I discuss in these blogs are also covered in a fictional narrative in my exciting, murder/mystery, Spirit of Prophecy. Do be sure to pop over to another part of my website and take a look. If you love horses, I know you’ll adore Spirit of Prophecy. Come take a look: http://bit.ly/2LeRJ84

My debut novel, Spirit of Prophecy features a mixture of the paranormal, wicca, science fiction wrapped up in a good old-fashioned murder/mystery, Spirit of Prophecy is centred around the rarefied world of three-day-eventing. I want to take some time today to explain a little about how the Three-Day-Event works and why it is so popular within the equine community and with the general public, at large.

In the equestrian world, the three-day event is seen, by many, to be the pinnacle of equine supremacy. Why would be this be so? Simply put, the three-day event tests all of the innate skills of the horse and of horsemanship by combining three equine events into a challenging series of obstacles that tests not only speed, endurance and courage, but also accuracy and temperament. It perfectly encapsulates all that makes horses and horse competitions so enthralling to both the equine community and the general public.

Three-day eventing and the horses and riders that participate in it forms the central platform of my debut novel, Spirit of Prophecy, with one of the principal characters Juliet Jermaine being the current Olympic champion in the Three-Day Event and her horses the focus of much of the action that takes place in the story. For this reason, I’d just like to explain how the three-day event works and give readers some insight into why it is such an esteemed event within the equine community.

Although eventing is extremely popular all over the world these days, it is and always was a quintessentially British sport. Like so many other sports Britain has introduced to the world, the students have, to a large extent, become the masters. The sport still has plenty of British champions, but the powerhouses of three-day eventing are now to be found in the colonies; New Zealand, Australia, the United States, Canada, and parts of South America. It is truly a world-wide phenomenon and incredibly popular, as both a televised and live spectator sport.
As hinted in the title of this piece, the three-day event is comparable to the human pentathlon or decathlon, in that it tests all aspects of a horse and rider’s skills, ultimately looking for, if you like, “the best equine athlete in the world.” Although some events are held over one or two days, in general terms, the event is performed over a three day time frame. It consists of three very different and challenging disciplines; dressage, cross-country, and show-jumping.

The dressage could perhaps best be put in terms of human endeavour. In many ways it is similar to a ballet performance, but one that requires the horses to undertake a series of predetermined moves, within a specified, enclosed arena. This is the only subjective part of the three-day event and a judge or team of judges awards demerit points for horses and riders that do not perform exactly to the laid-out requirements. Judges will be looking for balance, rhythm, suppleness and most importantly perhaps, cooperation and affinity between horse and rider. The basic idea of dressage is to show that a horse is not only capable of strength, power and endurance, but also can perform in a graceful, relaxed and precise manner. Demerit points awarded in this discipline are then carried over to the cross-country and show-jumping phases of the three-day event. The key to winning, for horse and rider is to score the lowest number of points.

The cross-country is the most physical of the three events and truly tests horse’s and rider’s, speed, stamina, courage and endurance. Cross-country courses vary all over the world and are unique to the designers, but they all have one thing in common; they aim to offer the rider an opportunity to take risks or to play it safe. There is often more than one way of completing an obstacle in the various challenges set. Many cross-country courses are set in exceptionally beautiful countryside, which encourages spectators to flock to the event for a “family day out”. Two of the most prestigious and beautiful such sites in Britain are the annual events held at Badminton and Burleigh, both of which are considered “must wins” for a three-day eventer to say they are at the pinnacle of their sport. As with the dressage, cross-country is about trying to score zero points (that is, make no mistakes to incur demerits). The usual demerit points in the cross-country phase are, 20 points for a horse refusing a jump or running out of the obstacle area, without jumping the obstacle. In addition to this, the cross-country is a timed event and demerit points are added to the horse’s total if they fail to complete the course, in under the specified time, commonly, this is 0.4 of a penalty point per second over the optimum time.

The show-jumping phase of the event is usually held the following day from the cross-country and before any horse is allowed to compete in this phase, they must pass a thorough veterinary inspection to ensure they have not been damaged in any way by the gruelling cross-country phase. Like all show-jumping events, faults are awarded for fences knocked down (4 faults), 1st refusal/disobedience (4 faults), 2nd refusal/disobedience or fall of horse/rider (Elimination), and time performance (1 penalty for every second over the optimum time).
Finally, after completion of the three stamina-sucking events a horse and rider, with the least number of demerit points over the course of the event, can be declared the winner and proud owner of the title; “the best equine athlete of the event”. One reason why this event is so popular as a sporting contest is that it is still one of the few sports where women and men compete alongside each other as equals. Many of the top eventers in the world are female.

Do, please, take a look at my exciting novel, Spirit of Prophecy, set in the exciting world of three-day-eventing. You can find out much more about it, here, on my website. http://bit.ly/2LeRJ84

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